Codes of Conduct

Basketball is intended to be a recreational activity for enjoyment and health. This code of conduct has been developed by Victorian Primary Schools Basketball League to give participants of all kinds some guide as to the expectations it has of those participants. It is intended to assist everyone to obtain the maximum benefit and enjoyment from their involvement in basketball. As a result, the quality of participation will be improved so people are more likely to start and continue their involvement in basketball. Enjoy!!!

Basketball is intended to be a recreational activity for enjoyment and health.

This code of conduct has been developed by Victorian Primary Schools Basketball League to give participants of all kinds some guide as to the expectations it has of those participants. It is intended to assist everyone to obtain the maximum benefit and enjoyment from their involvement in basketball. As a result, the quality of participation will be improved so people are more likely to start and continue their involvement in basketball. Enjoy!!!

Play by the rules.

Never argue with an official.

Respect the Referee’s decision at all times, you can discuss with your coach during a break or after the game in an appropriate manner.

Control your temper. Verbal abuse of officials or other players, deliberately distracting or provoking an opponent is not acceptable or permitted in basketball.

Work equally hard for yourself and for your team. Your team’s performance will benefit so will you.

Be a good sport. Acknowledge all good plays whether they are by your team or the other team.

Treat all players as you would like to be treated. Do not interfere with, bully or take unfair advantage of another player.

Co-operate with your coach, team-mates and opponents. Without them there would be no competition.

Play for the “fun of it” and not just to please parents and coaches.

Never use of ‘bad’ language based on gender, race or impairment and a player not missing a target.

Be prepared to lose sometimes. Everyone wins and loses at some time. Be a fair winner and good loser.

Realise that there are consequences for breaches of these Codes of Conduct, some of which are severe and may result in you being removed from the Stadium.

  1. Encourage your children to participate for their own interest and enjoyment, not yours.

    Support your children in their participation in basketball but do not force them to play if they don’t want to. Sport is played by children for enjoyment and fitness. It is good for their bodies but should also be good for their minds. If they feel too much pressure from you it may make them rebellious or even depressed. It is very tempting for parents who are involved in a sport, or who have children with abilities they wish they had themselves to try and force the children to participate or to participate at a level to which they do not aspire. Resist the temptation.

  2. Encourage children to always play by the rules. Just as responsible parents teach their children to obey the law of the land, so should those same parents encourage their children to play sport by the rules. If your children show no respect for the rules of the game of basketball, they can also come to believe that breaking the law is acceptable too. If you see your children constantly breaching rules you should be prepared to speak to them at an appropriate time.
  3. Teach children that an honest effort is always as important as a victory. Your children will suffer many disappointments in their lives. You should teach them from an early age that whilst a win in basketball will bring them much pleasure, it is not the most important thing. Participating to the best of their abilities is far more important than winning. You can help them learn this, so that the result of each game is accepted without undue disappointment.
  4. Focus on developing skills and playing the game. Reduce the emphasis on winning.
    If children see that effort is rewarded by an increase in skills, they will derive considerable pleasure and see the importance of striving to improve over the necessity to win every game. Primary responsibility for skills training rests with the children and their coaches but you can assist with their enthusiasm by attending games, encouraging them to practise away from formal training and games and even joining in with this practice.
  5. A child learns best by example. Applaud good play by all teams. Acknowledge all good plays whether they be by your children’s team or the other team. Good manners and respect can be infectious. If you acknowledge the achievements of your children’s opponents it is likely your children will follow suit. This can assist to create a positive and supportive climate for all children involved in the game.
  6. Do not criticise your or others’ children in front of others. Reserve constructive criticism of your own children for more private moments. Children can be very sensitive and feel strong humiliation if they are criticised in front of their peers. When you do feel the necessity to speak to your child about something that displeases you, make the effort to explain what the problem is and why you are concerned about it. If you can see some way of avoiding the problem in the future, also explain this to the children. Give your children an opportunity to offer you an explanation. You are not communicating with your children effectively if all the communication is one way.
  7. Accept decisions of all referees as being fair and called to the best of their ability. Referees and officials have a difficult task to perform and your children could not play the game without them. They are there to enforce the rules of play but they cannot always be right. Accept bad calls graciously. Abuse of referees is unacceptable behaviour. Players who consistently dispute decisions or do not accept bad decisions are bad sports. If you disagree with a decision, discuss it with your children in a constructive manner.
  8. Set a good example by your own conduct, behaviour and appearance. Children often learn by example. You are the prime role models for them. Make your parenting rewarding and beyond criticism by leading by example. Do not criticise opposing team members or supporters by word or gesture. Accept loss graciously and applaud the efforts of all playing the game. Do not be one of the “ugly” parents occasionally seen at sporting events.
  9. Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from sporting activities. Parents have considerable influence in how sports are conducted. Often they are called on to perform volunteer work to help organise their and others’ children’s’ activities. Use this rewarding experience, not just to assist in getting the necessary work performed, but also to influence the atmosphere in which your children play the sport. Children not as fortunate as yours whose parents are not willing or able to be involved may need some guidance on what is or isn’t acceptable behaviour.
  10. Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person. Regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background, religion or other factor irrelevant to the game, all persons connected with basketball are entitled to equal treatment and respect. Avoid any remarks that could be construed as offensive or discriminatory. Sometimes even a joke may give offence. Even if a person refers to themselves with a particular label, it should not be taken as an invitation for you to do so. Using discretion is imperative and it is better to err on the side of caution. Your children will most likely follow your lead in matters of discrimination and vilification.
  11. Show appreciation for volunteer coaches, officials and administrators. Volunteers are necessary for the functioning of sporting activities. Without them, your child could not participate. Whilst many are parents of people involved in the sport, many are also people dedicated to the sport and its development. Show them the respect and appreciation that they deserve.
  12. Keep children in your care under control. Basketball encourages you to bring your children to games. However, there can be dangers to them in a basketball stadium. They can also constitute a danger to players. You should ensure that children with you at a basketball game are well behaved and do not wander onto or too near to courts. They can easily be knocked down by a player or a player can trip over a child when concentrating on the play and not expecting a small child to be in the way.

Conduct myself in a dignified manner relating to emotions, language, attitude, actions and punctuality at all times so as not to damage the reputation of VPS Basketball League.

Develop team respect for the ability of opponents as well as for the judgement of referees, officials and opposing coaches.

Display control and professionalism and respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person you have contact with during all VPSBL games including; opponents, other coaches, officials, administrators, parents, players, and spectators.

Be aware and understand the role / influence of the coach as an educator. Therefore, impart knowledge in promoting skill, educational and social behaviour.

Never ridicule children for making mistakes or losing a game.

Be reasonable in your demands on players’ time, energy and enthusiasm.

Remember that children play for fun and enjoyment and that winning is a small part of their motivation.

Teach your players that the rules of the game even though the Referees may not call every violation. At some point in later Age Groups they will start to call more violations.

Whenever possible, group players according to age, height, skills and physical maturity.

Avoid over-playing the talented players. VPSBL recommends at early development stage, equal minutes on court for all players is the best way to drive development and sense of fair play.

The scheduling and length of practice times and competition should take into consideration the age and grade of your players.

Ensure that equipment and facilities meet safety standards and are appropriate to the age and ability of the players.

Seek to keep abreast of the latest coaching practices and principles, ensure that the information used is up to date and appropriate to the needs of the athletes while taking into account the principles of growth, strength, and development of children

Place the safety and welfare of players above all else.

Show genuine concern and caution towards sick and injured players.

Give all players a “fair go” regardless of the gender, ability, cultural background or religion.

At the lower Grades Prep – Grade 3 always call Fouls and coach the players on how to play better defence for next time.

Travelling and non-contact violations, are to be called more leniently to ensure better flow and player development. The violation should not assist the team with the ball to score in an unfair advantage.

Remain impartial, consistent, objective and courteous in making decisions, and accept responsibility for your actions and decisions.

Avoidance of any situation which may lead to or be construed as a conflict of interest.

Positively role model good behaviour and personal appearance.

Ensure your comments are truthful, positive and constructive Keeping up-to-date with the latest, “rules of the game”, trends and principles of basketball.

Refrain from any form of personal abuse towards anyone you may come into contact with whilst in the role of an official for VPS Basketball League.

Do not arrive at the venue intoxicated or drink alcohol during junior matches.

Respect the rights, dignity and worth of people involved in the game, regardless of their gender, ability, religion, cultural background or impairment.

Do not participate in any forms of violent, threatening or abusive behaviour.

Realise that there are consequences for breaches of these Codes of Conduct, some of which will result in termination of your VPS Basketball League Refereeing duties.

The Jewellery Policy includes any items that are used for decoration. This includes but is not limited to: rings, earrings/ studs, rings/studs, necklaces, bracelets, anklets and watches regardless of the material with which the item is made from.

Referees should monitor all players’ appearance prior to the commencement of the game, looking out for items listed above.

If an official establishes that a player has jewellery and or body pierced jewellery the following FIBA Interpretation shall be applied.

Players who wear jewellery that is visible and could cause injury to themselves or to other players shall be instructed as follows;

  1. Any player wearing an object that might cause injury (such as those objects listed above) must be politely told of the existence of the rule (referees should not presume that a player is aware of the rule) and be asked to remove the object prior to taking the court.
  2. If a player claims that an item cannot be removed, the referee should instruct the player that he/she must cover the object with a suitably protective device such as medical tape. The player may not participate until such time that the referee is satisfied that the object is appropriately covered.
  3. Where the protective device (e.g. tape) falls off during the game the referee must stop play at the next opportunity and direct the player to remedy the cover. If this occurs more than twice then the referee should instruct the player that they can no longer participate in the game, unless they remove the jewellery.

Wrist Bands/ Activity Trackers (i.e. Fit Bit)

The various rubber, leather and silicon etc. wrist bands (fitness bands) are regarded as objects which may cause injury to other players.

Consequently, players must remove the bands prior to playing or have them covered with adhesive tape, or towelling sweatband, eliminating any possibility of another player getting their finger(s) caught under them.
The player may not participate until such time that the referee is satisfied that the band(s) are appropriately covered. Where the protective device (e.g. tape) falls off during the game the referee must stop play at the next opportunity and direct the player to remedy the cover. If this occurs more than twice then the referee should instruct the player that they can no longer participate in the game, unless the band is removed.

Medical information

Wrist Bands may be worn by players if they are;

  1. Not dangerous to other players;
  2. Covered using medical strapping tape; or
  3. Covered using an athletic sweatband.

Referee responsibility

The referee should prohibit the player from participating in the game in the following circumstances:

  1. A referee is not convinced that such a protective measure will adequately overcome the risk of injury;
  2. Suitable protective measures are not available; or
  3. The player refuses to remove or cover the offending object

The uniform of all team members shall consist of:

  1. All players numbers must be on the score sheet prior to the scheduled start time of their game.
    Players wearing VPS temporary uniforms must ensure these are collected prior to the game by their Team Manager or Coach. All players (male and female) must tuck their singlet into their shorts at all times of the game. The Referee is responsible for asking the players to do this. If the player refuses to do so, the coach will be informed and then politely asked to speak to the offending player. If the player refuses for no substantial reason (medical) then the player will be asked to leave the court and not return to the game until their singlet is tucked into their shorts.
  2. All teams players must be wearing their allocated VPS BL team school uniforms. These are allocated and designed by VPS Basketball League and its uniform partners. These uniforms remain the property of VPS Basketball League and any defacing of the uniform will result in the players family purchasing a new uniform to replace. The cost will be $100 including GST.

RELIGIOUS CLOTHING

Religious head gear, provided it is black, white or same dominant colour of playing singlet, may be worn during VPSBL games and common sense must be used in these situations.

Victorian Primary Schools Basketball League encourages all parents and non-parents who intend to and are likely to coach or fill in as a coach at some point throughout the season to apply for their Working With Children’s check.

How to apply for a Working With ChildrenCheck (vic.gov.au)

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Dear VPS Basketball League players, coaches, families and spectators, following on from Basketball Victoria’s announcement to suspend all regulated basketball competitions until further notice with the hope of minimising any potential risk of spreading COVID-19, VPS Basketball League must follow suit.

All games will be cancelled. We are hopeful of returning to normal fixturing and games on Friday April 17th.
Please note – this date could change.